“Maar wat als mensen zouden moeten kiezen tussen een goede hel en een valse hemel? Waar zouden ze dan voor kiezen? De meeste mensen zullen zeggen dat een valse hemel hoe dan ook beter is dan een goede hel. Aan het begin zullen ze nog wel weten dat ze in een valse hemel zitten, alleen zullen ze te bang zijn om hem te ontmaskeren. Maar naarmate de tijd verstrijkt zullen ze vergeten…
The elephant in the room is the necessary change that everyone avoids, the work required to adapt. Leaders bring reality into the office, uncertain about the path to follow, but convinced that action is needed. They give direct feedback, don't accept stalling or excuses and take responsibility for what needs to be done. Are you afraid of the elephant in the room?
‘Put the elephant on the table,’ was the motto of the successful team of Philippe Gilbert, the no. 1 in the world in cycling of 2011[i]. Wouter Torfs says the same thing about the success of his company: “We have an open culture of direct feedback. We dare to say the good and the bad things to each other.” The elephant in the room is the thing we don’t like to talk…
We easily associate leadership with personal courage. Why is that? Why is leadership personal at all? The answer lies in the definition of leadership. Setting the agenda for change is a personal choice. As Heifetz quotes Max Weber: "Here I stand, I can do no other.' Leadership provokes stress and loss  because it's necessary. And the leadership role remains dangerous and heavy…
"How can we understand and define leadership, not only in its effectivity, but also in its morality?" "Did Hitler show great leadership?" It's an easy question to provoke a debate on leadership. The answer to that question is not easy. I read already some books on leadership and most of them are prescriptive: "do this, do that and be successful." Some of the books inspired me.…